Let’s just hope that you are not reading this article while you are fasting. Even if you are, just take notes, do not get carried away and try these foods in your Suhur or Iftar. We all know that Ramadan comes with countless blessings for Muslims around the world. Some of these blessings include the special Ramadan foods that suddenly come to surface in all the Muslim communities. As delicious as all of these foods are, some of them are actually worthy of a special mention.

The two main meals during Ramadan are suhur (served before dawn) and iftar (served after sunset). Muslims like suhur to be a hearty, healthy meal so that they have the energy to get through the day. At the end of the day, when the sun sets, the day's fast is broken with iftar. Many Muslims break their fast by eating dates and drinking lots of water or sugary juices before beginning the iftar meal. This meal is what every community tries to make special. Let’s see the meals that are famous in different Muslim communities around the world.

1.Umm Ali (Egypt)

An Egyptian delight, a soft and creamy dessert, with chewy edges and crunchy bits of pastry and nuts poking through is something that people in Egypt love to eat during Ramadan. It is traditional food that dates back to the Ayyubid dynasty and is very economical to make. It is made up of phyllo pastry, milk, double cream, nuts and is sometimes topped with raisins, powdered sugar, and coconut flakes.


2.Ramadan Kebabi (Turkey)

A Turkish Kabab recipe made from Meat mixed with yogurt, tomato, and garlic stuffed with fresh mint or garnish on Pide bread.tomato, and garlic stuffed with fresh mint or garnish on Pide bread.


3. Qatayef (Saudi Arabia)

It is an Arab dessert very commonly eaten during Ramadan in Saudi Arabia. Qatayef is a sweet dish often filled with Akkawi cheese, or any unsalted cheese. It can also be filled with nuts. Some like it fried and others bake it, it is then drizzled with honey, sweet sugar syrup or powdered sugar. Indeed, a delicious dessert to enjoy during Ramadan.


4. Haleem (India)

In India, special Haleem is prepared during the month of Ramadan and is transported all over the world through a special courier service. Haleem is traditionally cooked in large, wood-fired cauldrons.


5. Jalebi (Pakistan)

Jalebi is a well-known Pakistani sweet. It's an eye-candy of sweet lovers. Jalebis are cooked at bakeries and sweet shops regularly in Pakistan however people buy it at certain events, occasions and at times of happiness. In the month of holy Ramadan, jalebi becomes significantly more in demand.


6. Chorba (Morocco)

One of the foods commonly eaten to break the fast in Morocco is chorba, which means soup in Arabic.It can be made in infinite ways, though most often chorba is associated with a hearty Moroccan soup made from vegetables and chickpeas, usually with diced lamb and some sort of pasta or grain.chorba, which means soup in Arabic.It can be made in infinite ways, though most often chorba is associated with a hearty Moroccan soup made from vegetables and chickpeas, usually with diced lamb and some sort of pasta or grain.


7. Fasulia (The Middle East and North Africa)

Filling stew made all over the Middle East and North Africa with white kidney beans, lamb or beef meat and tomato sauce, which is served with white rice or with fresh hot bread. White kidney beans are called fasulia in Libya.


8. Kolak (Indonesia)

A fruit dessert that is loved and enjoyed by locals in Indonesia made with palm sugar, coconut milk, and pandanus leaf. Fruits such as jackfruit or banana are added, or mung beans.


9. Harees (Gulf)

It is a popular dish in Arab countries of Persian Gulf and is traditionally eaten during Ramadan. A porridge of wheat (often soaked overnight) and lamb all ground up together. Just wheat and meat often sweetened with sugar and cinnamon. It will hit all your senses.


10. Bamia (Middle East and Africa)

Whether it is scorching sunlight of June or a cold night of December, bamia will still arguably be one the most famous food. Tender mutton falling off the bone, a rich immersion of garlic, tomato, lemon and okra, served with luscious fluffy and crispy rice, it ought to make it to your Iftar table.


Words of Wisdom: Bamia's flavor is considerably heightened if consumed the day after it is made.

In addition to these delicious foods, fresh seasonal fruits, and seasonal vegetables are consumed in abundance in all the regions around the world. Some other foods that you must try during Ramadan are:

  • Sherbet (Turkey) - the world's first soft drink made from fruit juices, extracts of flowers, or herbs, and combined with water and sugar.
  • Chapatis (Pakistan and India) - wheat bread that is rolled up with vegetables and meats.
  • Shami kebab (India and Pakistan) - fried patties of ground meat and chickpeas.
  • Fattoush (Lebanon and Arab countries) - a salad made of vegetables and pita bread.
  • Khyar Bi Laban (Middle East) - a mouth-watering cucumber and yogurt salad.
  • Mujadarra (Middle East) - a dish made with rice and lentils.
  • Konafah (Middle East) - a pastry made with phyllo dough and cheese.
  • Ful medammes (North Africa) - fava beans cooked with garlic and spread on bread.